Transforming what's possible

Micron's memory components (DRAM and Flash) are used in today’s most advanced products such as computers, workstations, servers, cell phones, MP3 players, wireless devices, digital cameras and gaming systems. Our heritage is in memory, but our expertise reaches so much deeper. We're an innovator and industry leader, developing groundbreaking technologies that transform what's possible.

Micron’s commitment to excellence depends on a superior workforce. As a result, we focus on growing the next generation of scientists and engineers. This website is one way Micron encourages young people to explore the high tech careers of the future. You are the future of technology! You are the consumers, designer, innovators, fabricators, of the next generation technologies! Explore this site to find out more.

10 Reasons to pursue a technical career

  • Benefit society

    Engineers developed and improved computers, animation, global positioning systems, cell phones, DVDs, CDs, lasers, video games, digital cameras, camcorders, robots, medical equipment, printers, copiers, TVs, automotive equipment, and memory.

  • Work in a dynamic team environment.

    Share and exchange ideas with others to solve problems and maximize potential.

  • Training is available near you.

    Colleges and universities offer a variety of two- and four-year degrees in technical fields including engineering, semiconductor manufacturing, electronics, and production operation management.

  • Immediate openings for technicians and engineers.

    Opportunities for employment and advancement continue to increase.

  • Maximize your brainpower.

    Problem-solving and logical thinking are the tools of an engineer.

  • Stimulate your imagination.

    Engineers use their creativity to turn great ideas into reality.

  • Be well rewarded!

    Starting salaries for engineers are among the highest for college graduates and include profit sharing, bonuses, patent awards, and comprehensive benefits.

  • Be on the cutting edge.

    Engineers work with the latest equipment to design the future.

  • Solve real-world challenges.

    Engineers link scientific discovery to applications in innovative ways.

  • It's where the action is!

    The need for engineers and technicians is outpacing the supply, creating great opportunities for employment.

Industry

A look inside the history and manufacturing process of semiconductors.

Learn More

Show Me the Money

No High School diploma or GED
  • Full-time workers age 25 years and over without a high school diploma had median weekly earnings of $415.**
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$1,000,000
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs*
    • Retail salespersons
    • Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners
    • Waiters and waitresses
    • Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food
High School diploma or GED
  • Full-time workers age 25 years and over with a high school diploma had median weekly earnings of $597.** (May require additional Apprenticeship Training) 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$1,200,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs* 
    • Carpenters 
    • Cooks, restaurant 
    • Police and sheriff's patrol officers
    • Plumbers, pipe fitters, and steam fitters 
    • Electricians
Vocational Certificate
  • Full-time workers age 25 years and over with a vocational certificate had median weekly earnings of varying amounts based on certificate earned, related work experience and market demand. 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$1,500,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs*
    • Dental assistants 
    • Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants 
    • Automotive service technicians and mechanics 
    • Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists 
    • First-line supervisors/managers of food preparation and serving workers 
    • Self-enrichment education teachers 
    • First-line supervisors/managers of retail sales workers
Associate's degree (2 Year)
  • Full-time workers age 25 years and over with an associate's degree had median weekly earnings of $700.** 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$1,600,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs* 
    • Electronics 
    • Technician 
    • Registered nurses 
    • Computer support specialists 
    • Dental hygienists 
    • Paralegals and legal assistants 
    • Medical records and health information technician
Bachelor's Degree (4 year) / experienced & entry level
  • Full-time workers age 25 years and over with a bachelor's degree had median weekly earnings of $966.** 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$2,100,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs* 
    • General and operations managers 
    • Management analysts 
    • Financial managers 
    • Computer and information systems managers 
    • Sales managers 
    • Elementary school teachers, except special education 
    • Accountants and auditors 
    • Computer, software, electrical, and applications engineers 
    • Computer systems analysts 
    • Secondary school teachers, except special and vocational education
Master's Degree
  • Among college graduates with advanced degrees (professional or master's degree), had median weekly earnings of $1,217.** 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$2,500,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs* 
    • Physical therapists 
    • Clergy 
    • Educational, vocational, and school counselors 
    • Instructional coordinators 
    • Rehabilitation counselors
Doctoral degree / Professional degree
  • Among college graduates with advanced degrees (professional or master's degree, and above), the highest-earning 10 percent made $3,090 or more per week.** 
  • Expected life-time earnings over 40 year working life is ~$3,400,000 - $4,400,000 
  • Projected occupations to have the largest number of new jobs* 
    • Physicians and surgeons 
    • Lawyers 
    • Pharmacists 
    • Veterinarians 
    • Chiropractors 
    • Post secondary teachers 
    • Clinical, counseling, and school psychologists 
    • Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 
    • Computer and information scientists, research 
    • Biochemists and biophysicists

What's it like to work in a global high-tech company?

Listen to the variety of career paths available to you

  • SENIOR DESIGN ENGINEER

    "My job exposes me to state-of-the-art design problems in a cutting edge environment. Since every day brings new problems to solve, my job stays fresh and exciting."
    Brian, Senior Design Engineer


    What do you do in your position?

    I work as a Senior Design Engineer in the Research and Development group. My primary role is to serve as a group leader for a team of very talented engineers and designers. We develop new types of high-speed memory products. New product development includes overall product and architecture design, design of individual circuits, device simulation, device verification, and product debug and characterization.


    How or why did you decide to enter a technical career?

    I started college enrolled in an architecture program. Most of the courses in the program were art based and as a result were graded subjectively. I realized that the absence of objectivity was going to drive me crazy, so I jumped into an electrical engineering program and immersed myself in science and math disciplines with right and wrong answers.


    What do you like about your job?
    Give an example of an interesting project or opportunity.


    My job exposes me to state-of-the-art design problems in a cutting edge environment. Since every day brings new problems to solve, my job stays fresh and exciting. A side benefit to the project that I am currently on is the opportunity to travel to various destinations in the U.S., Japan, Korea and Germany for meetings with other engineers.


    What high school courses helped you prepare for your job or
    college program?


    I feel that all of the college prep courses contributed to my preparation for college. These included math, science, and English. I especially liked high school physics and an advance composition course my high school offered. The latter course paid big dividends to me in college, since I tested out of the normally required freshman English classes.


    What post-high school education did you pursue?

    I received a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering in 1982 from the University of Idaho. I started this program straight out of high school. I also earned a Master of Science degree in electrical engineering in 1996 from the University of Idaho while working full-time at Micron.


    What advice would you give a student interested in pursuing a technical career?

    Take as many college prep courses as you can. They will ease your transition into college level coursework and help accelerate you through your freshman year.


    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I love spending time with my family. My personal hobbies include bodybuilding, photography, tinkering with cars and riding my Harley—especially on winding mountain roads.


    Education: Design Engineer

    The degree typically sought for this position is a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering.

    Read More
  • TEST TECHNICIAN

    "If you are interested in a technical career, definitely pursue it!"
    Sandra, Test Technician


    What do you do in your position?

    I am an Equipment Maintenance Technician in the Test department. My responsibilities include making sure that the equipment is running properly, trouble-shooting failures, performing preventative maintenance and calibrations, and providing support for production needs.


    How or why did you decide to enter a technical career?

    I have always had an interest in electricity and originally wanted to become an electrician. Once I learned more about electronics, I knew that's what I wanted to do in college.


    What do you like about your job? Give an example of an interesting project or opportunity.

    What I like most about my job is each day I am faced with a new challenge. Every day is different and things change all the time so my job is never the same. I was involved in changing the step-by-step process used to perform temperature calibrations. Once the process was in effect, I was responsible for re-calibrating all of the equipment using the new process.


    What high school courses helped you prepare for your job or
    college program?


    I had the opportunity to take a basic wiring and electronics course in high school that directed me towards electronics.


    What post-high school education did you pursue?

    I have an Associate of Applied Science in electronics technology degree from Boise State University.


    What advice would you give a student interested in pursuing a technical career?

    If you are interested in a technical career, definitely pursue it! Research, talk to people, and get the information you need to further your education. Our world of technology is growing so fast and there is such a high demand for people with the skills that you couldn't go wrong.


    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy fishing, camping, bike riding and spending time with my three-year-old daughter.


    Education: Test Technician

    The degree typically sought for this position is Associate of Applied Science in electronics. Candidates with a military background as an electronics technician specialist are also considered for this position.

    Read More
  • FIELD SERVICES ENGINEER

    "I chose a technical career because of the future it has to offer, the opportunity it gives me to learn and test my skills, and the fact that I find it very rewarding."
    Jones, Field Services Engineer


    What do you do in your position?

    I install and maintain personal computers (PCs), laptops, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and printers. I also work with many telecommuters who work for Micron in different parts of the U.S.


    How or why did you decide to enter a technical career?

    I chose a technical career because of the future it has to offer, the opportunity it gives me to learn and test my skills, and the fact that I find it very rewarding.


    What do you like about your job? Give an example of an interesting project or opportunity.

    I enjoy working with other groups within information systems (IS) and meeting people all across the company. One day I may work with personnel team members and the next I'm solving problems for people in sales and marketing.


    One of my current projects is working with the PDA team. The team consists of people from network services, IS logistics, and the e-mail group. We work together to implement PDA usage among Micron team members and standardize PDA technical support for end-users, so the PDA can become a commonly used tool.


    What high school courses helped you prepare for your job or
    college program?


    My high school didn't offer many technical classes, but I found taking a higher-level math class prepared me.


    What post-high school education did you pursue?

    My education over the last few years includes taking math classes at BSU and networking classes at Treasure Valley Community College. I've also taken some Micron-sponsored classes.


    What advice would you give a student interested in pursuing a technical career?

    Take classes that are technically challenging. Don't be afraid of learning something new.


    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy spending time outside. I spend my time away from work running, mountain biking and snow and water skiing.


    Education: Field Services Engineer

    A Bachelors of Science in Information Technology/Information Systems is preferred for this position. A+ Certification and the Microsoft Certified Service Engineer certificate also demonstrate skills needed for this position. Candidates with an internship in a related field have a strong advantage.

    Read More
  • PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR

    "There are many different technical careers for people to pursue. You just need to find one that fits you and the skills that you bring to the table."
    Joe, Production Supervisor


    What do you do in your position?

    For the most part, I am a "Supervisor of Resources." I manage million-dollar tool sets, ensuring that engineering is aware of production needs and, most importantly, effectively managing area employees on the production floor. There are many different factors that influence the decisions I make, but my main focus is running the right mix of product in the area to meet weekly and quarterly goals for product shipments.


    How or why did you decide to enter a technical career?

    I was not entirely sure that I wanted to work in a technical career when I was going to school. To help get a better understanding if this was something that I wanted to pursue, I interned at Micron's Boise site. The way the internship was laid out, the amount of interaction I had with all levels of management and the types of projects that I worked on made for a very impressive internship. I did my internship the summer before my senior year, and after I finished, I knew I wanted to pursue a position at Micron.


    What do you like about your job? Give an example of an interesting project or opportunity.

    The thing that I like the most are the "fires" that flare up that need immediate attention. You will have issues on a weekly and sometimes daily basis that become your number one priority. These are things you typically can't plan for - personnel situations, equipment going down (resulting in bottlenecks), and fulfilling your boss's requests.


    One of the things that we as a company have set out to do is make a wide variety of parts available to our customers. One of the current items I am working on is keeping our low volume parts moving through all areas on the production floor at a reduced cycle time. The production fab I work in is currently running 14 different parts, which, for a production fab, is a ton! In general, the more parts you have the higher the number of processes or recipes that you have to run to make each part. My role is to coordinate with the supervisor for each area to get the necessary tools available to run the low volume parts in a timely manner.


    What high school courses helped you prepare for your job or
    college program?


    I don't think there was one magic class that prepared me for my current position or even college. For me personally, the thing that I think helped the most was the diversity of classes available. Electives that I took in high school in philosophy, printing press and marketing along with the basic core curriculum gave me some basic knowledge in other areas. You hear talk of having a sound base to build from; this is something I strongly believe helps you prepare for college or a job with a company. Anything you can do at the high school level to broaden your knowledge base will help you be successful in the long run.


    What post high school education did you pursue?

    I attended the University of Idaho for four years and received a bachelor of science degree in business with a double major in information systems and production operations management. Since starting at Micron in 1998, I have taken classes to enhance my leadership skills, computer skills, communication skills and production-related knowledge and skills. In all, I've taken more than 434 class hours.


    What advice would you give a student interested in pursuing a technical career?

    There are many different technical careers for people to pursue. You just need to find one that fits you and the skills that you bring to the table.


    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy playing golf, traveling (weekend trips to Sun Valley and McCall) or just shooting some hoops with friends. One of the best trips I took this past fall was to Stanley, Idaho, where we did a day hike and had some great views of the Sawtooth Mountains.


    Education: Production Supervisor II

    Degrees typically sought for this position are a Bachelor of Science in production operations management.

    Read More
  • TECHNICAL WRITER

    "Every project is interesting. Most of the work I see involves the 'next generation' or the 'future of the department.' Technology moves fast, and it seems like every week I see exciting, cutting-edge processes and equipment."
    Bree, Technical Writer


    What do you do in your position?

    I write online documentation for all Assembly cleanroom processes, maintain the Assembly Intranet site, create graphics, and develop Web applications. I work with production personnel, technicians, engineers, training specialists and programmers. I gather information, perform usability studies, create presentations, teach classes, provide technical support, review new software and mentor new writers.


    How or why did you decide to enter a technical career?

    I enjoy building and creating things. I like to make an elaborate meal, design and make clothes or crafts, design and build cabinets or work on my car.


    I entered college with a mechanical engineering degree in mind. I figured that I could combine my two loves of skiing and creating to get an engineering job with a chairlift manufacturer. After a few semesters, reality struck, and I saw how narrow my scope of career choices was. So I looked back at all my high school and college classes to see if any stood out as fun, interesting, and challenging. One did: technical writing. It's as methodical as designing a structure, but I can still be creative, and I can make a difference in people's lives. As for skiing, I do that for fun rather than a career.


    What do you like about your job? Give an example of an interesting project or opportunity.

    I like the interaction I have with the engineers and production staff. They all have different perspectives and experiences, so I learn more about the equipment and processes than anyone else. From that knowledge, I can create documents that bridge the communication gaps while meeting everyone's needs and interests.


    Every project is interesting. Most of the work I see involves the "next generation" or the "future of the department." Technology moves fast, and it seems like every week I see exciting, cutting-edge processes and equipment.


    What high school courses helped you prepare for your job or
    college program?


    I took as much math, science, English and foreign language as I could. Each one provides skills in problem-solving which is valuable no matter what career you choose. However, the most influential classes for me were Spanish and French. After years of diagramming English sentences, I discovered that I didn't understand it as well as I thought. I understood the mechanics, but not the value. Learning a new language forced me to really think about the parts of a sentence and what each part means ("Aaah! So that's what you mean by future perfect progressive tense!"). After that revelation, language took on a completely new meaning.


    What post high school education did you pursue?

    After a short visit to the engineering curriculum, I set my sights on a degree in technical communication. I tried to keep my class load well-rounded. If you become a writer, you won't necessarily know the industry for which you will write. So I took history, marketing, communication, accounting, statistics, chemistry, calculus, art, and (of course) English--lots of English. Having some background in other fields helps me understand the material about which I write. It's gratifying to catch mistakes and inconsistencies because you truly understand the topic and the technical language.


    What advice would you give a student interested in pursuing a technical career?

    Focus on a field that you enjoy and that you are willing to make into a career. Take every opportunity to ask questions of people in that field and volunteer to "job shadow" for a day. If your field has a local professional chapter, join, get involved, and make yourself known (most have reduced rates for students). Sometimes jobs are only advertised at professional meetings.


    Make the most of your college education by getting excellent grades, but also build working relationships with your professors and fellow students. You never know when an opportunity will strike, and that rapport with the esteemed professor will pay off when you have the privilege to use his or her name as a reference on your resume.


    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy spending time with my family, skiing, water skiing, bicycling, and attending NASCAR events (I especially enjoy driving the stock cars). I also participate in the Snake River Chapter of the Society for Technical Communication. From my involvement with the society (which started in college), I've gained so many memorable experiences and friendships—not to mention wonderfully fulfilling jobs!


    Education: Technical Writer

    Degrees typically sought for this position are a Bachelor of Arts in technical communication.

    Read More

Women in engineering

You may think technology is just a guy thing. Think again!

Careers for women in science math and technology are as varied as the women in those careers. Continue reading to learn more about them. How are bullet proof vests, skateboards, and the Mars Pathfinder related? All are uses for Kevlar®, a polymer fiber invented by Stephanie Kwolek. She was a chemist for DuPont and is a member of the Inventors Hall of Fame. Her advice to young women interested in careers in science and technology is to pursue advanced degrees and have multiple majors.

Meet the women in engineering

  • Collette says, "Imagine the Possibilities"

    Is your answer to "what's next" still a big question mark?

    Are people asking you what you're going to do after high school? Are you still uncertain? Have no fear, you are not alone. Even students who are absolutely sure of what they are going to do after high school change their minds.

    Are people asking you what you're going to do after high school? Are you still uncertain? Have no fear, you are not alone. Even students who are absolutely sure of what they are going to do after high school change their minds.

    I graduated from Centennial High School in Boise, ID and headed to college in Ohio with a girlfriend. After about a semester or two, I got homesick and came home to attend Boise State University.

    I knew I wanted a career and an education, but what career? I was confused. Nursing was my major, but I was no longer convinced that nursing was for me.

    Between semesters, I started working as a production operator at Micron Technology. Within a couple of years, I had been promoted from operator to on-the-job trainer to production-area lead. Now as a manufacturing associate, I work with others in both production and sales to make sure that the right products move through the production line at the right pace to ensure timely shipment to our customers.

    What's helped me be successful at Micron are my communication, math, organization, and computer skills; my ability to work with a team; my attention to detail; and my willingness to continue learning. I've been taking a number of computer and leadership classes, and now I'm ready to go back to college. This time I'm going to pursue a business degree with a minor in Computer Information Systems.

    I know first hand that college isn't for everyone-especially right out of high school-but taking the SAT and ACT exams and any advanced placement classes like English, chemistry, and pre-calculus while your are in high school will keep the college doors open.

    To help you make up your mind about what kind of career you would like, go to career fairs, try job shadowing, volunteer in your community, talk with people in different careers, and surf the web. Keep all your options open by preparing yourself in high school, and imagine the possibilities!

    Visit Engineer Girl!, part of the Celebration of Women in Engineering project that highlights the opportunities in engineering, particularly for women and girls, where you can "turn imagination into reality with a future in engineering."

    Read More
  • Meet Susanna, a Surface Scientist

    My name is Susanna, and I'm a surface scientist.

    Even in the first grade, I liked science. I found books at the library on every topic from the ocean to the stars. From that point, being a scientist was for me.

    I found books at the library on every topic from the ocean to the stars. From that point, being a scientist was for me. So, my schooling was basically planned. I was supposed to go from high school to college, and then I would be a scientist. Only it didn't work out quite that way.

    While in college I met a great guy, fell in love, and got married. The real twist was that he was in the Navy. Now I had to look at a career differently because if we were to spend time together I had to be able to move when he did. I became a teacher.

    The good news was that all the math and science which prepared me to be a scientist had also prepared me to be a teacher. As we moved from California to Japan to Spain to Virginia, I could always find a job teaching science and math. I had both flexibility and a career.

    In Virginia, my life took another twist. I was offered the opportunity to work towards a master's degree in physics. Now I could be a scientist!

    As a graduate student in physics, I was accepted in a research program at NASA Langley. We looked at how materials changed when exposed to radiation. This was part of a BIGGER project designing the space station.

    As you know the earth's atmosphere shields us from a great deal of radiation. If we are to put structures in space and want them to last, we need materials which can withstand this radiation. Our experiment was to bombard different types of polymers (plastic) with electrons and then perform a variety of tests to see how the material was changed. Some crumbled in our hands after exposure to the electrons. Others had virtually no change.

    Langley was the place where I was able to see what scientists really do perform experiments, analyze data, purchase equipment and supplies, make presentations, write reports, discuss ideas, and LEARN and LEARN and LEARN.

    After finishing my masters degree, I applied to a Navy rework facility where workers take airplanes apart and replace or repair parts to make it like new. They called me the day they received my application. They needed someone with my background. I was hired the next day!

    While working for the Navy, I studied oil, hydraulic fluid, aluminum honeycomb, paints, grease, bearings, and just about anything associated with airplanes. We also helped determine the cause of airplane crashes. It was amazing work! Everyone worked on a piece of the puzzle, and then together, we would look at the big picture and solve the mystery. Some people may believe that scientists work all alone in a lab somewhere. But we have lots of interaction and often meet to share ideas and problems.

    Now I study materials at Micron. My job here is much the same. I learn as much as I can about the problems that exist as we look for a solution. Every day is a challenge. My job provides information critical to the production of memory chips.

    What's next? I'm not exactly sure, but there must be a third career just around the corner.

    Read More
  • Meet Brook, an Electrical Engineer

    My name is Brook, and I'm an electrical engineer.

    I graduated from Brigham Young University (BYU) in 1997 and immediately went to work for Micron. Math and science were two of my favorite subjects, and my teachers often told me that I would be a great engineer.

    Math and science were two of my favorite subjects, and my teachers often told me that I would be a great engineer. My father was in the military, so we moved around a lot. It seemed like every time we moved, I arrived just in time for career day where I listened to engineers talk about making and creating things that people use. I thought it would be great to improve things to make life better and to create things that did not previously exist.

    In high school I took advanced placement math, science, and physics classes to prepare me for college. Surprisingly, one of the classes that helped the most was keyboarding, because now I spend a lot of time each day at the computer entering data and code. It helps to be fast! This gives me more time to spend on the more interesting parts of my job.

    We work as a team to create solutions to the problems we have identified. Most of my time is spent collecting and analyzing data and working with other engineers to explain what I have observed. We are constantly working to increase the speed and decrease the size of the electronic devices that we all use every day-in computers, DVD and CD players, cell phones, MP3 players, global positioning units, and televisions. Working to improve computers and tomorrow's technology is very motivating for me.

    Another benefit of choosing electrical engineering was the numerous job offers I received when I graduated. Sometimes I'm asked if it was weird pursuing a degree where my peers were mostly guys and my coworkers are mostly men, but it is no big deal. I grew up in a house full of brothers and am very competitive. We all work as a team and everyone contributes and pulls his or her own weight.

    I really like what I do and strongly encourage you to pursue what interests you. School may be hard, but don't be intimidated by picking a tough field. Don't let anything stand in your way! Do what you can now to keep your options open after high school.

    Read More

Discover Great Women of Science that you may not have learned about in your science or technology class including:

  • Rosalind Franklin, DNA pioneer
  • Helen Hogg, astronomer
  • Grace Hopper, programming pioneer
  • May Chinn, early cancer researcher
  • Emmy Noether, mathematical genius
  • Maria Goepper-Mayer, Nobel prize physicist
Discover Great Women of Science

Maximize your opportunity to land the job

Large companies receive thousands of job applications every year and less than 20% lead to job interviews. In addition less than half of those interviewed are hired. So don't get discouraged. Here's some tips on how to be prepared and be ahead of the competition.

Tips to be prepared:

  • Getting Started

    Have you considered how a job will affect your everyday life?

    • Know Your Limitations
      • When can you work?
      • What are your other commitments? 
      • How will you get to work? 
      • What do you like to do? 
      • What are you good at? 
    • Where do I find job openings? 
      • Newspaper want ads 
      • Department of Employment 
      • Family, friends and neighbors 
      • Job fairs 
      • School counselors and career centers
      • Internet job sites 
  • First Impressions

    Give them something to read.

    The first time an employer meets you is in writing. Convince them you are a qualified candidate.

    • Job application
    • Cover letter
    • Resume including extracurricular activities
    • School transcripts and attendance records
    • References—people who can vouch for your dependability and... work ethic
    • Previous employers
    • Teachers or counselors
    • Neighbors for whom you worked
  • Impressive candidates look impressive!

    "I want this job."

    • Washed and well-groomed
    • Conservative, clean, appropriate clothes
    • Shoes in good repair
    • Trimmed beard or clean-shaven
  • The Interview

    Job interviews can be intimidating experiences.

    • Arrive 5 or 10 minutes early. Speak clearly. Try and relax. Smile.
    • Shake hands with the interviewer and look your interviewer in the eye.
    • Be upbeat. Turn every negative into a positive.
    • Speak well of former employers and previous jobs.
    • Keep your answers relevant. Be complete without being long-winded.
    • Do your research. Use the internet to find out what the company does and a few pertinent facts about it.
    • Be prepared to ask at least two relevant questions about the job.
    • Be prepared to state your best qualities and give supporting examples of what you want the potential employer to know about you.
  • After the Interview

    Leave the interviewer with a good impression of both you and your desire for the job.

    • Tell the interviewer your want the job.
    • Shake hands and thank him or her for the interview.
    • Ask for a business card if you're not given one voluntarily.
    • Write a thank you card to the interviewer expressing appreciation for his or her time and reinforcing your interest in the job.
    • If you haven't heard from the employer in a week, follow up with a phone call to let them know you're still interested and find out if the job has been filled.
    • Don't be discouraged if you don't get the job. Keep trying.
  • The Selection Process

    There are many factors in selecting candidates.

    • Pre-Employment Assessment
      • Some positions require a pre-employment assessment to determine the skill level and competencies of the applicant. Assessment content may measure skills such as:
        • Attention to detail
        • Math, including algebra
        • Memory
        • Reading comprehension
      • Transcript Evaluation
      • Reference check
      • Drug Screening

Just for fun

  • Chip Camp

    Exploring the Future of Science

    Each summer, the Micron Foundation hosts Chip Camp. This free day camp is for students completing either the 7th or 8th grade and focuses on hands-on science activities related to the semiconductor industry. Students learn what engineers and scientists do every day.

    Find out more about Chip Camp and registration dates

  • How can you tell if you are destined to be an engineer?

    When you were younger, did you:

    • Ask which authoring tool your computer games were written in?
    • Tear apart your teddy bear and study the chemical composition of the filling?
    • Remove the voice box from your talking doll and reprogram it to recite the periodic table?
    • Have a Bill Gates or Albert Einstein poster in your room?
    • Get into arguments at school because you use a PC & other kids use a Mac?
    • Ask for Carl Sagan books instead of Dr. Seuss?
    • Find the one burnt-out bulb on the light string at Christmas?
    • Attempt to build a 'phazer' from the garage door opener and the camera flash?

    If you replied yes to any of these, congratulations! You are destined to be an engineer!!!

  • Engineers' Perspective:

    Do these make you laugh?

    • Instead of seeing the glass as half empty or half full, you see the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
    • Engineers know the call 'Strike 1, Strike 10, Strike 11 - You're out!' is from the game Base 2 Ball
    • Engineers know which James Bond character is FIFO - Queue.
    • Engineers understand that the roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference. And that he acquired his size from too much pi.

  • Newton Revisited...

    A play on physics!

    Law of Chicken inertia: Chickens at rest tend to stay at rest. Chickens in motion tend to cross the road, unless acted on by an outside force. In that case, you'll need to clean the feathers out of your car grill!


    Law of teenager inertia: "Bodies in motion remain in motion, and bodies at rest stay in bed unless their mothers call them to get up."


    Law of Cat Motion: A cat will move in a straight line, unless there is a really good reason to change direction.

  • Math Humor

    A new joke for you.

    A rubber band pistol was confiscated from algebra class because it was a weapon of math disruption.

  • Top Nine Excuses used by Math Students for not doing homework:

    Can you think of any good ones?

    1. I accidentally divided by zero and my paper burst into flames.
    2. Isaac Newton's birthday.
    3. I could only get arbitrarily close to my textbook. I couldn't actually reach it.
    4. I have the proof, but there isn't room to write it in this margin.
    5. I was watching the World Series and got tied up trying to prove that it converged.
    6. I have a solar powered calculator and it was cloudy.
    7. I locked the paper in my trunk but a four-dimensional dog got in and ate it.
    8. I couldn't figure out whether i am the square root of negative one or i is the square root of negative one.
    9. I took time out to snack on a doughnut and a cup of coffee. I spent the rest of the night trying to figure which one to dunk.

  • Trivia

    Test your knowledge...

    Three English Squires sit side by side on the ground. The first squire, who is sitting on a goatskin, has a son who weighs 140 pounds. The second squire, who is sitting on a deerskin, has a son who weighs 160 pounds. The third squire, who weighs 300 pounds, is sitting on a hippopotamus skin. What famous geometric theorem does this symbolize?


    ANSWER: The squire on the hippopotamus is equal to the sons of the squires on the other two hides.